Rajat

Rajat

Ancient Sound Healing

By Annaliese and John Stuart Reid Most ancient cultures used the seemingly magical power of sound to heal. Sound healing had almost disappeared in the west until the 1930s when acoustic researchers discovered ultrasound and its medical properties. With this discovery, research burgeoned and today the ancient art of sound healing is rapidly developing into a new science.

Fascinating stuff:

"-The Aboriginal people of Australia are the first known culture to heal with sound. Their ‘yidaki' (modern name, didgeridoo) has been used as a healing tool for at least 40,000 years.
-The Egyptian culture extends back to 4000 BC and they have a long tradition of vowel sound chant....Egyptian priestesses used sistra, a type of musical rattle instrument with metal discs that creates not only a pleasant jangling sound but, as we now know, also generates copious amounts of ultrasound.
-The Pythagoras Mystery School, based on the island of Crotona, taught the use of flute and lyre as the primary healing instruments and although none of Pythagoras' writings have come down to us we know of his philosophy and techniques from many contemporary writers.
-As a musical instrument the gong has wonderful healing properties because it contains virtually the whole spectrum of audible sound. Human cells, immersed in the gong's sound field, absorb the frequencies they need—a kind of sonic food—and reject what is not needed. "

Rajat

Rajat

Ariel Garten provides a demonstration of Muse
YouTube l https://www.youtube.com/

That's Ariel Garten doing alive demo of meditation. Brings me to think of the Healing Spirit app I have on my phone. The app has the same kind of sound choices--ocean, forest, night etc and tries to get you into a Alpha wave or lo-frequency pattern.

Emma Zahren-Newman

Emma Zahren-Newman

Ariel Garten: Know thyself, with a brain scanner
TED l http://ted.com

Technology and psychology working together to solve humanity's inner struggles. This is something worth spending your time on!

Adam Pryor

Adam Pryor

When Blind People Do Algebra, The Brain's Visual Areas Light Up

A study of 17 people who have been blind since birth found that areas of the brain usually devoted to visual information become active when a blind person is solving math problems.

Alas, we just discovered how smart our brains are!
"In both blind and sighted people, two brain areas associated with number processing became active. But only blind participants had increased activity in areas usually reserved for vision.

The result suggests the brain can rewire visual cortex to do just about anything, Bedny says. And if that's true, she says, it could lead to new treatments for people who've had a stroke or other injury that has damaged one part of the brain."

Rajat

Rajat

Why Do We Dream?

Jaan Aru is a researcher at the Computational Neuroscience Research Group and at the Talis Bachmann Lab at the University of Tartu. Anyone who suddenly gets an urge to attack a scientific problem that is interesting, intriguing, and 'big' might end up with the question 'why do we dream?'.

Have you ever wondered why different events and characters get bizarrely mixed up in dreams?

-If memory is stored in our neurons by firing of electrical currents and creation of chemical connectivity signatures then could the dreams represent a "merge document" phenomenon?
-"A recent theory proposes that dreams are the way they are because they directly reflect the consolidation of memories (scientists use the complicated word ‘consolidation’ to describe the process which stabilizes memory traces in your brain).
-Should the dreams correspond one to one to the daily activities to bear any role in memory consolidation? The fact that dreams never exactly replay events from daily life but rather combine them with other events actually supports the theory that dreams reflect memory consolidation. New memories are stored in the networks that already carry older memories, and the partial reactivation of them is responsible for our unique dream experiences that involve elements experienced in different epochs of our life."
- Some of the other well known and older theories of dreams : a)"Sigmund Freud managed to popularize the view that dreams represent unfulfilled wishes that creep up from our subconscious. Freud believed that there are special processes which try to disguise the unfulfilled wishes before they emerge in dreams. This would explain why our dreams are sometimes bizarre. However, in general these ideas of Freud do not have much credibility when the contents of dreams are subject to scientific analysis. b)Allan Hobson has argued that dreams do not represent anything at all – they just reflect the random activity patterns of the brain. This theory is probably also too extreme, as dreams clearly have a structure in space and time and the dream content often corresponds to the everyday activities of the dreamer."

Adam Pryor

Adam Pryor Sleep (particularly slow-wave, or deep, sleep, during the first few hours) is also thought to be important in improving the consolidation of information in memory, and activation patterns in the sleeping brain, which mirror those recorded during the learning of tasks from the previous day, suggest that new memories may be solidified through such reactivation and rehearsal. http://www.human-memory.net/processes_consolidation.html

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Naina Balsavar

Naina Balsavar Similar questions surround dj vu ..."Instances of dj vu in healthy individuals may also be attributed to a mismatch in the brains neural pathways. This could be because the brain is constantly attempting to create whole perceptions of the world around us with limited input." http://neurosciencenews.com/deja-vu-temporal-lobe-epilepsy-4040/

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Adam Pryor

Adam Pryor This piece draws an interesting distinction between REM and Non REM sleep. "The majority of dreams - certainly the most memorable and vivid dreams - occur during REM sleep, and it is thought that the muscular atonia that accompanies it may be a built-in measure to protect us from self-damage which could occur while physically acting out these vivid REM dreams. ....Some memory consolidation, particularly of procedural and spatial memory, also takes place during this stage, although perhaps not to the same extent as during the deeper, later stages of non-REM sleep. It has been noted that people tend to spend more time than usual in REM sleep following days when they have been in unusual situations requiring them to learn a lot of new tasks." http://www.howsleepworks.com/types_rem.html

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Vidushi Sharma

Vidushi Sharma

The Strange Brain of the World's Greatest Solo Climber - Issue 39: Sport - Nautilus

Alex Honnold has his own verb. "To honnold"-usually written as "honnolding"-is to stand in some high, precarious place with your back to the wall, looking straight into the abyss. To face fear, literally. The verb was inspired by photographs of Honnold in precisely that position on Thank God Ledge, located 1,800 feet off the deck in Yosemite National Park.

Interesting piece on Alex Honnold, a free climber who has scaled Yosemite's near-vertical Half Dome without any rope or protective equipment. Researchers plunked him into a scanner and found that his brain might, quite literally, be unmoved by fear.

Sofia Perello

Sofia Perello Seems that Alex himself debunks this claim! "For the most part, if something seems really scary I just dont do it. Im under no obligation. I do this strictly for my own satisfaction. If Im afraid, I either put in more time preparing or I just dont do it. Ive done routes where Ive climbed 200 feet off the ground and just been, like, what am I doing? I then just climbed back down and went home. Discretion is the better part of valor. Some days are just not your day. Thats the big thing with free soloing: when to call it." http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/01/160103-honnold-climb-mountain-solo-adventure-ngbooktalk/

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Rajat

Rajat Interesting to consider what happens on neuro level when the brain suddenly grows into an imbalance in teenagers: "During adolescence, the subcortical region of the brain matures rapidly. This region is associated with the motivation system. So the individual becomes increasingly responsive to new sensations and novel situations and experiences. It becomes sensitive to rewards, so individuals are often found to engage in reward-seeking behavior." http://brainblogger.com/2015/04/17/deciphering-troubled-teens-risk-taking-behavior/

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Adam Pryor

Adam Pryor

How Social Media Affects Us: Your Brain on Facebook, Twitter, and More

It's likely the first thing you reach for when you wake up, and the last thing you look at before bed: your phone. Perpetually glued to our fingertips, our phones always manage to bring a couple of their friends along, too. (You may know them as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.)

.."Triggering of our brain's dopamine system by unexpected actions or the buildup of anticipation — i.e. those heart-stopping moments when you're waiting for someone to text you back"

Jeff Gordan

Jeff Gordan

The Neuroscientist Who Wants To Upload Humanity To A Computer

Everything felt possible at Transhuman Visions 2014, a conference in February billed as a forum for visionaries to "describe our fast-approaching, brilliant, and bizarre future." Inside an old waterfront military depot in San Francisco's Fort Mason Center, young entrepreneurs hawked experimental smart drugs and coffee made with a special kind of butter they said provided cognitive enhancements.

"Roughly 85 billion individual neurons make up the human brain, each one connected to as many as 10,000 others via branches called axons and dendrites. Every time a neuron fires, an electrochemical signal jumps from the axon of one neuron to the dendrite of another, across a synapse between them. It’s the sum of those signals that encode information and enable the brain to process input, form associations, and execute commands. Many neuroscientists believe the essence of who we are—our memories, emotions, personalities, predilections, even our consciousness—lies in those patterns."
"Randal Koene: that our identity is nothing more than the behavior of individual neurons and the relationships between them. And that most of the activities of the brain, if technology were capable of recording and analyzing them, can theoretically be reduced to computations."

Ted Tyler

Ted Tyler reposted his Link

How your eyes betray your thoughts

According to the old saying, the eyes are windows into the soul, revealing deep emotions that we might otherwise want to hide. Although modern science precludes the existence of the soul, it does suggest that there is a kernel of truth in this saying: it turns out the eyes not only reflect what is happening in the brain but may also influence how we remember things and make decisions.

"“The eyes are like a window into our thought processes, and we just don’t appreciate how much information might be leaking out of them,” says Richardson. “They could potentially reveal things that a person might want to suppress, such as implicit racial bias.” Mo Costandi