Rajat

Rajat

Don't we feel the abundance of water on Earth five that 75% of the surface is covered with it. But here are the facts: "WATER IS SCARCE"
"-Blue spheres representing relative amounts of Earth's water in comparison to the size of the Earth. Are you surprised that these water spheres look so small? They are only small in relation to the size of the Earth. This image attempts to show three dimensions, so each sphere represents "volume." The volume of the largest sphere, representing all water on, in, and above the Earth, would be about 332,500,000 cubic miles (mi3) (1,386,000,000 cubic kilometers (km3)), and be about 860 miles (about 1,385 kilometers) in diameter which is about 11% of Earth's diameter of 7917 miles.
-Smaller sphere over Kentucky represents Earth's liquid fresh water in groundwater, swamp water, rivers, and lakes. The volume of this sphere would be about 2,551,000 mi3 (10,633,450 km3) and form a sphere about 169.5 miles (272.8 kilometers) in diameter. Yes, all of this water is fresh water, which we all need every day, but much of it is deep in the ground, unavailable to humans.
-The vast majority of water on the Earth's surface, over 96 percent, is saline water in the oceans.
-Ice caps, permanent snow and ground water represent only 1.75% of the total water but account for 68.7% of all freshwater."
Source usgs.gov; http://water.usgs.gov/edu/earthhowmuch.html

Jeff Gordan

Jeff Gordan

Is blue the new green? Wave power could revolutionize the renewable-energy game

Unless you're a surfer, a sailor or the owner of beachfront property during hurricane season, you probably don't spend much time thinking about the power of waves. That may be changing soon. Like a large, slowly building swell miles from shore, the wave-power revolution has quietly and gradually gained momentum.

"According to the U.S. Department of Energy, waves along American coastlines have the potential to generate as much 2,640 terrawatt hours a year — enough to power more than 200 million American households, free of emissions.

There’s more: Waves are more consistent and predictable than either solar or wind power, meaning it will be easier to plan the integration of wave energy into a power grid. They also pack a bigger punch. Water moving at 12 miles a hour (normal for a standard day at the beach) offers the same power potential as wind moving at 110 miles per hour (not so standard for a day anywhere)."

Rajat

Rajat

10 things you should know about sea level rise and how bad it could be

Sea level rise has been in the news a lot lately. Recent research has raised concerns about the possible collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and how this could double sea level rise projections for 2100. Sea level rise is potentially one of the most damaging results of climate change, but few people understand its risks.

"1. There is enough water stored as ice to raise sea level 230 feet.
2. Sea levels have changed by hundreds of feet in the past.
3. We are changing sea level at a very rapid rate.
4. We could melt it all.
5. Scientists are racing to better understand how sea level will rise as temperatures climb higher and higher.
6. The last time sea levels changed significantly, there weren’t a lot of people around.
7. Sea level rise is not going to stop anytime soon.
8. Sea level rise will not be the same everywhere.
9. Melting Arctic sea ice does not contribute directly to sea level rise.
10. The cost of sea level rise will go up faster than sea level itself."
Source: The Washington Post.

Jeff Gordan

Jeff Gordan Yes there is natural cycle of heating and cooling but that does not make for the argument that humans are not interfering with the ecosystem or causing any climate change as some vested interests would like everybody to believe.

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Adam Pryor

Adam Pryor

NASA | A Year in the Life of Earth's CO2
YouTube l https://www.youtube.com/

Very interesting video on how CO2 and CO travel around the globe and the clear impact of seasons.

Emma Zahren-Newman

Emma Zahren-Newman great visual

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Mason Clark

Mason Clark

Graphene layer could allow solar cells to generate power when it rains

The latest news from academia, regulators research labs and other things of interest ( Nanowerk News) Solar energy is on the rise. Many technical advances have made solar cells quite efficient and affordable in recent years. A big disadvantage remains in the fact that solar cells produce no power when it's raining.

All weather solar cells are here!
A team in China:
"-In order to allow rain to produce electricity as well, they coated this cell with a whisper-thin film of graphene
-Graphene is a two-dimensional form of carbon in which the atoms are bonded into a honeycomb arrangement.

-Graphene is characterized by its unusual electronic properties: It conducts electricity and is rich in electrons that can move freely across the entire layer (delocalized).In aqueous solution, graphene can bind positively charged ions with its electrons (Lewis acid-base interaction). This property is used in graphene-based processes to remove lead ions and organic dyes from solutions.
-At the point of contact between the raindrop and the graphene, the water becomes enriched in positive ions and the graphene becomes enriched in delocalized electrons. This results in a double-layer made of electrons and positively charged ions, a feature known as a pseudocapacitor. The difference in potential associated with this phenomenon is sufficient to produce a voltage and current.

Source Nanowerk; National Nanotechnology Initiative.

Ethan Garcia

Ethan Garcia

Climate Change captured beautifully in watercolor. "Pelto’s paintings are based on several different data sets that measure glacial melt, animal populations and forest fires, among others. Each set focuses on the ways that climate change has affected these aspects of the environment.

Seven years ago, Pelto began assisting on a project led by her father, glacial researcher Mauri Pelto, to measure the health of the glaciers in Washington’s North Cascade National Park. The project, which measures snow depth across a wide area to determine to what extent the glaciers there recede each year, has been ongoing for 31 years." Source PBS http://buff.ly/1SlJJlk

TheHobMob

TheHobMob

Artists cover mountain with blanket to stop melting

Move over, Christo and Jeanne-Claude: There are new Earth artists in town, and their muse is climate change. In 2014, artists Lars Bergström and Mats Bigert installed a giant reflective blanket atop Sweden's tallest mountain, Mount Kebnekaise, which has been losing an average of a meter a year to rising temperatures.

Great symbolism at it's peak.

Adam Pryor

Adam Pryor

Richest 10% are causing climate change, study finds

Fifty percent of the world's carbon emissions are produced by the world's richest 10%, while the poorest half - 3.5 billion people - are responsible for a mere 10%. This is according to a new report by Oxfam, which also found that the richest 1% of the world's population emit 175 times more carbon than those living in the bottom 10%.

Climate Change. The role and responsibility of the rich cannot be escaped in this discussion....."Fifty percent of the world’s carbon emissions are produced by the world’s richest 10%, while the poorest half – 3.5 billion people – are responsible for a mere 10%. This is according to a new report by Oxfam, which also found that the richest 1% of the world’s population emit 175 times more carbon than those living in the bottom 10%." Donald Armbrecht at World Economic Forum.

TheHobMob

TheHobMob

What Goes In & Out of Hydraulic Fracking

Hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking", is the process of drilling and injecting fluid into the ground at a high pressure in order to fracture shale rocks to release natural gas inside.

"We burn
more carbon
air warms
for decades
but seas
for millennia."
Greg Johnson Climate Expert

What goes in and out of hydraulic fracturing (in the link above Dangersoffracking)contains an excellent and chilling illustrative display about how we are damaging our environment.

Mason Clark

Mason Clark Big money oil; big money fracking; no money NGO's; no money environmentalists.

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