Anju Sharma

Anju Sharma

The Girl Who Silenced the World at the UN | KarmaTube

Born and raised in Vancouver, Severn Suzuki has been working on environmental and social justice issues since kindergarten. At age 9, she and some friends started the Environmental Children's Organization (ECO), a small group of children committed to learning and teaching other kids about environmental issues.

Very impressive speech by a twelve year old girl at the United Nations summit. Please watch.

Anju Sharma

Anju Sharma

Harambe, Cecil: Why we mourn animal deaths so intensely

You imagine yourself driving a trolley down a fixed track. Five people are immobilized in your path. If you continue, they'll surely die. If you pull a lever, the trolley will switch to another track, but you'll kill a single person standing there.

Must read. The irony of our reactions in different situations. Don't get me wrong. I would rather never have either Harambe or Cecil killed. However I question the hundreds of people who would rather have the child dead to punish the mother accused of bad parenting. I wonder how many of those people have been perfect parents with no slip ups and have never eaten an animal that was killed by humans for the purpose of consumption of its meat. Double standards...

Vidushi Sharma

Vidushi Sharma

Animals are now recognised as 'sentient' beings, like humans

The New Zealand Government has formally recognised animals as 'sentient' beings by amending animal welfare legislation. The Animal Welfare Amendment Bill was passed on Tuesday. The Act stipulates that it is now necessary to 'recognise animals as sentient' and that owners must 'attend properly to the welfare of those animals'.

I read today that New Zealand just ruled to recognize animals as sentient beings, like humans. I wonder what the real impact of this ruling is, but it's impressive that it even got through to this stage. Reminds me of this piece about Bolivia's Mother Earth Law: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/peter-neill/law-of-mother-earth-a-vis_b_6180446.html

Sofia Perello

Sofia Perello I had never heard of the Mother Earth law! Cool that it is considered to be the first instance of environmental law that gives legal personhood to the natural system-- definitely going a step beyond anything I had heard of. Does anyone know the story about how it passed?

0

Rajat

Rajat Alas a lot more has also to be done to consider "all" human beings as sentient! Isn't is strange that we are even having this discussion?

0

Brighter Green

Brighter Green

The Hummingbird and the Climate Summit

Co-authored by Wanjira Mathai, director of the wPOWER Project at the Wangari Maathai Institute for Peace & Environmental Studies at the University of Nairobi and Chair, Green Belt Movement Wangari Maathai, the Kenyan environmentalist and 2004 Nobel Peace Laureate, was fond of recounting a children's story she'd been told on a visit to Japan.

It can be hard to stay positive and and maximize our passions for the greater good when working on environmental issues, but we hope you take inspiration from one of Wangari Maathai's stories!

Brighter Green

Brighter Green

The Assertive Vegetarian

This blog entry was originally written by What's For Dinner? director Jian Yi on a train ride to Beijing on World Vegetarian Day (October 1) 2014. What's For Dinner? and Vegucated have had six successful screenings in Guangzhou.

Jian Yi, director of documentary "What's for Dinner?", shares his thoughts on being an assertive vegetarian in modern China, where options are scarce and usually assumed to be for the Hui Muslim population.

"Many of us vegetarians tend to acquiesce to the status quo with the utterance, 'let things be'. This takes us away from what vegetarianism really means. The utterance, 'let things be', despite the many situations in which it is an apt saying, too often veils our laziness, cowardice, and helplessness. Becoming vegetarian is an active choice to advocate a compassionate lifestyle.

Violet Grant

Violet Grant I'm not a vegetarian yet, but I think that this piece is great reading for meat eaters and vegetarians alike in order to improve the dialogue on this very polarizing issue!

0

Vidushi Sharma

Vidushi Sharma @Violet, thanks for saying that-- I do wish there was an easier way to broach vegetarianism/veganism in our culture where meat eating is taken for granted. What I really liked about this piece was learning about the Hui culture in China, which I had never heard about before. But do the Huis avoid meat altogether, or do they avoid pork & alcohol as is more common in other Muslim regions?

0

Remigio Simon

Remigio Simon I would love to hear from Jian Yi or others in China more about their experience with green/vegetarian culture in one of the most growth-obessed countries in the world right now. I think growth too often means ignoring environmental and ethical responsibilities, and the more bureaucratic a gov't is, the harder it is for minority opinions to eke by. What has been the reception of What's for Dinner? in China?

0

Brighter Green

Brighter Green

Feeding the Homeless Vegan

As the discussion on the intersection of social justice movements widens, two such projects in Asia are demonstrating that the animal rights movement is not limited to one group alone as humans who have fallen to the wayside of society are being empowered through vegan ethics and activism.

Many articles have been in the news recently about the tension between animal rights/sustainable diets and tackling malnutrition in India. Here's a blog post from the Brighter Green website this summer that covers an organization that bridges the gap between the two.

Ethan Garcia

Ethan Garcia Interesting observation "the animal rights movement through vegan ethics advocates not only for animals, but also for justice and equality for all species on the planet"

0

Vidushi Sharma

Vidushi Sharma I definitely think that what you mentioned @Ethan is an often-forgotten part of the vegan movement!

0

Vidushi Sharma

Vidushi Sharma

Brazil: Cattle, Soyanization and Climate Change

Amid global pressure to curtail the destruction of the Amazon forests as a prime means of addressing climate change, Brazil's president, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva has pledged to cut deforestation rates by 72 percent by 2018. He has however also promised to double the country's cattle herd - nearly 200 million at present - by this time, too.

This video made by Brighter Green describes Brazil's complex relationship with livestock rearing and the environment. Issues of animal welfare intersect strongly with environmental problems. BG has covered issues of meat intensification and environmental degradation in Brazil, India, and China.

To read more about Brighter Green's work, click here: http://brightergreen.org