Rajat

Rajat

Amazing game theoretic take on "The evolution of trust" or rather mistrust :\
Sit back, it will be time well spent(my score 30). Offers a glimpse into the real world of trust, altruism in face of compounding effects of fake news and "virtually" social interaction!

Anju Sharma

Anju Sharma

Give Back Box

Give Back Box® provides vendor services to retailers and charities, allowing each and every cardboard box a second life to help people in need. So it is also a 'green' solution!

This is such a wonderful "green solution". Hoping to implement at work too. Let's see!

Jeff Gordan

Jeff Gordan

Time to Choose on iTunes

Watch trailers, read customer and critic reviews, and buy Time to Choose directed by Charles Ferguson for $9.99.

Must be shown to every youngster in schools and colleges with a proviso of an absent slip if parents think it taints their children!

"--- A sobering polemic about global warming that balances familiar predictions of planetary doom with a survey of innovations in renewable energy technology that hold out some hope for the future. – Stephen Holden, New York Times, Jun 2, 2016

-- A film that shapes and alters your perceptions. – Owen Gleiberman, Variety, Jun 3, 2016"

Rotten Tomato reviews.

TheHobMob

TheHobMob

The Link Between Forest Fires and Your Paper Choices

Originally published in Printing Impressions by Canopy Campaigner Catherine Stewart. Record-breaking heat is blasting the southwest as fires devour parts of California, New Mexico and Arizona. Eighty-thousand people were recently evacuated from the northern Alberta city of Fort McMurray as fire raged through Canada's boreal forest.

"It is well documented that the carbon footprint of printing is mainly attributable to paper. Several studies have shown that 48-79% of the carbon footprint of books, magazines and catalogs comes from the manufacturing of paper and only 4-17% of the carbon footprint of a major printed product is attributed to the printing process itself."

Ethan Garcia

Ethan Garcia

Edible, Biodegradable Food Packaging - Headline Science
YouTube l https://www.youtube.com/

"Biodegradable alternatives like chitosan and essential oils have been studied as potential replacements, and now scientists have used the milk protein casein to create a packaging film which is degradable, edible and much better at preventing spoilage than plastic."
http://newatlas.com/casein-milk-packaging/45005/

Ethan Garcia

Ethan Garcia

8 maps show plastic's impact on the world's oceans - and what's being done about it

August 15, 2016 - The world's oceans are awash in plastic pollution, and as these maps and charts show, the situation is poised to worsen unless drastic changes take place. Over the coming decades global plastic production is slated to increase nearly sixfold, and collection and recycling systems in many parts of the world already are struggling to keep up with the proliferation of plastic products and associated waste.

"Over the coming decades global plastic production is slated to increase nearly sixfold, and collection and recycling systems in many parts of the world already are struggling to keep up with the proliferation of plastic products and associated waste.

Broadly speaking, plastic pollution comes from three main sources: single-use applications such as food packaging and disposable consumer goods; long-lasting plastic items, including pipes and construction materials; and durable consumer products such as electronics and furniture.

The impacts of plastic — and in particular, microplastic — on marine life can be devastating. Hundreds of species of seabirds, turtles, seals, sea lions, whales and fish have suffered entanglement or death due to plastic pollution in recent decades."

Adam Pryor

Adam Pryor

Living Planet: One world, one climate - one future | All media content | DW.COM | 30.06.2016

It's a special focus on climate change in the developing world as we report on the European Development Days. We meet the musicians bringing people together through music for sustainable use of the world's longest river. Conference-goers tell us what climate change really means for them.

Hear from those who are directly impacted.

Mason Clark

Mason Clark


"-A recent study based on satellite data estimates that there are 3 trillion trees on Earth - that’s over 400 trees per person
-Forests cover a third of the world’s land. At the beginning of the 20th century, the Earth’s forest area was about 50 million square kilometers. This has since shrunk to less than 40 million square kilometers. Most of this decline was caused by the growing demand for forest and paper products, as well as for agricultural land use.
-In the last 25 years, the world’s forests shrank by 1.3 million square kilometers. Which means that since 1990 the world’s lost more forest area than the size of South Africa. Another way of thinking about it: since 1990, we’ve lost the equivalent of 1,000 football fields of forests every hour. Or about 800 soccer pitches an hour if that’s your thing."

http://blogs.worldbank.org/opendata/five-forest-figures-international-day-forests

Rajat

Rajat I am very surprised that India/South Asia is showing a net positive forest cover!

1

Adam Pryor

Adam Pryor

E-Waste: Downside to the Tech Revolution | China Water Risk

Highlights -China is one of the largest producers of e-waste with >6 mt/year; E-waste can be highly toxic & wastes resources-Only 10-15% of global e-waste is recycled; part of the issue is that recycling is difficult, dangerous & expensive-The Shanghai [WE] Project changes this, it is easy & scalable; the time to join is now with growing consumption Chances are you are reading this article on a smartphone or tablet, or maybe even a traditional desktop computer.

"Worldwide we are consuming more electrical and electronic products than ever before, which creates a hidden but terribly harmful trail of e-waste. Huge amounts of energy and raw materials are used to make items such as an iPhone; and once they are thrown away, those same raw materials end up in landfills or incinerators where they become toxic pollutants."

Ethan Garcia

Ethan Garcia

Why your $8 shirt is a huge problem
YouTube l https://www.youtube.com/


Buy fewer and lasting quintessential clothes.

"Fleece-wearers beware.

Researchers at the University of California Santa Barbara found that a single fleece jacket can lose as many as 250,000 synthetic fibers, or 1.7 grams of plastic, in the laundry — which adds up. All those fibers travel from your washing machine into your local wastewater treatment plant, where 40 percent end up in rivers, lakes, and oceans. Researchers found these microfibers all over the planet, from the bottom of the Indian Ocean to midwestern farmland.

The study, which was funded by Patagonia, estimates that the amount of fibers that are released into waterways each year could be equivalent of nearly 12,000 plastic grocery bags. And like plastic bags, microfibers break down and eventually wind up in the gastrointestinal tracts of fish — and the humans that eat them. These plastics absorb pollutants like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), a neurotoxin and hormone disrupter."
Source: Grist.org

Anju Sharma

Anju Sharma Good energy, good feng shui, good on the budget, and less stressful! I like it!

0

Rajat

Rajat

Rusholme's new cycleways
YouTube l https://www.youtube.com/

While Mayor Gonnelli is recuperating, it may well be worth highlighting one of his upcoming projects "Dedicated safeguarded Bike Lanes". Makes perfect sense. Let's go green Secacucus.

Anju Sharma

Anju Sharma Well, this makes a lot more sense than the two feet strips on sides of roads for bikes that go along with cars, or next to cars. Even though I have ridden bikes a lot in India where there are no separate lanes for bikes, the traffic there goes much slower. Here the speeds are such that if you are hit by a car, you'd probably fly a few feet in the air before landing- which makes it scary riding bikes on main roads. This kind of segregated lane is indeed very helpful.

0

Anju Sharma

Anju Sharma reposted TheHobMob's Photo


This is not only a problem in Ghana. There are many such places in India also where this is happening. Hopefully someone will look into it one day.

AGBOGBLOSHIE: BRIDGING GAPS

Posted on January 26, 2016
Good evening!

I’m Vidushi, a junior in Princeton’s philosophy department. Born in Allahabad, India, I moved to New Jersey when I was a year old and have found my way to many places around the world ever since. This is my first time in Ghana (and Africa).

When we landed in Ghana, I focused almost entirely on the environment. A thin layer of dust, blown up from the red soil, permeated even the punctuation marks hanging behind our words. The honking of cars and drivers’ bravado, the large, randomly placed Nestle advertisements, and the constant maze of hawkers reminded me of New Delhi. In the Agbogbloshie scrap yard, I was struck by the textures and colors of the metal, the constant clinking of hammer to metal, the thick black smoke that spiraled up from the copper burner’s fingers. Despite its initial impression–one of sensory overload–the area is carefully organized, with sections for working with tires, refrigerator foam, copper wire, aluminum, batteries, and so on. The chairman and vice chairman sit in the yard in an open shanty of their own. In my sketchbook, I recorded what I particularly noticed:

cows and goats dotted onto a hill made of e-scrap and blackened by copper smoke

large soccer match schedules chalked onto a blackboard in the middle of two worksites

chicken feathers collected inside a half-dismantled television.

the Muslim call to prayer resounding on Agbogbloshie megaphones

babies– facedown on a piece of cardboard, playing with toys, swinging behind their mothers in cloth slings

people cutting each other’s hair on purple plastic chairs in an open-air “barber” shop behind a tire heap

teenagers running and playing with a blue ball, men sitting down for mancala

a swift breath of lemon peels as we walked through smoke

Beyond the media’s portrayal of Agbogbloshie as a dumping ground, a wasteland, people’s lives are woven into this soil. Some stay for 25 years, some only for a few months between jobs. But life goes on, and with it travel the strong communities and relationships that give it purpose. Men call each other brothers, even if they have never met. Light-hearted verbal barbs fly between people from the same worksite. These men, women, and children share each others fears–another government demolition, a sickness hitting their loved ones–and desires, like raising enough capital to expand their businesses, and moving out of Agbogbloshie and into university or an entrepreneurial space.

Our lives are woven into Agbogbloshie’s soil as well. One hut we passed had a tattered American flag blowing on it. Another motorcycle featured a large U.S. Marine Corps logo with a bald eagle glaring ahead. People wore shirts from the last Superbowl, and I could imagine that any number of the bicycles, refrigerators, microwaves, or sewing machines had made their way here after a long life in the U.S. or abroad, perhaps even through my own home.

Our challenge this week is how to bridge the gap created by language, skin color, wealth, and an ocean of distance. Today was the first day of interviews, and we were nervous about how we would be received. Both our eyes and theirs were often questioning and downcast, our lips often wavering in uncertain silence. But we also exchanged laughs, realized that our Agbogbloshie guides shared our ages and our interests in soccer and learning. It feels like the tentative start of a real relationship.

–Vidushi
https://princetonistghana.wordpress.com/2016/01/26/agbogbloshie-bridging-gaps/

**You would find day 3 coverage by Kelly Bryne interesting: http://goo.gl/Qa6JB7

Anju Sharma

Anju Sharma http://factordaily.com/seelampur-indias-digital-underbelly/

0

TheHobMob

TheHobMob

Sailing Seas of Plastic - Interactive Data Visualisation

This map shows the global distribution of floating plastic in our oceans based on a recent study estimating a total mass of floating plastic debris of about 268,000 tonnes.

"The two oceans of the Northern Hemisphere contain 56% of all particles and 57% of the total weight. In the Southern Hemisphere the Indian Ocean appears to have a greater particle count and weight than the South Atlantic and South Pacific oceans combined."

Dumpark.com

Jeff Gordan

Jeff Gordan

Stanford researchers show fracking's impact to drinking water sources

Only one industry is allowed to inject toxic chemicals into underground sources of drinking water - hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking." Concerns about this practice have riled the U.S. political landscape and communities around the country, perhaps nowhere more so than in Pavillion, Wyoming, population 231.

When will we stop destroying our most precious resource?

“This is a wake-up call,” said lead author Dominic DiGiulio, a visiting scholar at Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences. “It’s perfectly legal to inject stimulation fluids into underground drinking water resources. This may be causing widespread impacts on drinking water resources.”
As part of the so-called frackwater they inject into the ground, drilling companies use proprietary blends that can include potentially dangerous chemicals such as benzene and xylene. When the wastewater comes back up after use, it often includes those and a range of potentially dangerous natural chemicals"

Source Stanford News

Rajat

Rajat Scary that ...The EPA has consistently walked away from investigations where people and the environment appear to have been harmed by frackings impact on groundwater"

0

Jeff Gordan

Jeff Gordan

16 Of The Most Magnificent Trees In The World

How do I love thee, tree? Let me count the ways; you change carbon dioxide into the oxygen we breathe, you sequester carbon, and you provide shelter for countless critters. There are many reasons for which we should all be tree-hugging hippies, but within the scope of this article, all we'll focus on is how amazing some of them look.

Check out these beautiful trees

Vidushi Sharma

Vidushi Sharma Perhaps the most magical tree of them all is Methuselah, the oldest tree in the world. It's location is a guarded secret, and it's never been publicly identified for fear that people would come and damage it.

1

George Cohen Lee

George Cohen Lee Agreed! Here's a great piece on Methuselah. It makes total sense to keep its identity a secret. http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/23/science/earth-day-worlds-oldest-tree-bristlecone-pine.html?ribbon-ad-idx=4&rref=science&module=Ribbon&version=context®ion=Header&action=click&contentCollection=Science&pgtype=article

0

Anju Sharma

Anju Sharma

22 Pictures Of Food Packaging That Will Fuck You Off So Much

sigh* if only bananas came with a protective skin on them...

This doesn't seem to be America, or at least the places I shop at; however, it is quite sickening to see this colossal waste of money and generation of plastic...

Emma Zahren-Newman

Emma Zahren-Newman These places could learn a thing or two from Cuba! And Cuba could learn a thing or two about health and safety...

0

Vidushi Sharma

Vidushi Sharma How are things usually packaged/presented in Cuba? In NZ I've seen TINY little cereal boxes for a dollar, meant for a single use. It's pretty similar to the US.

0

TheHobMob

TheHobMob

What is climate change?

Find out how and why the Earth's climate is changing as Paris hosts a major summit to discuss global warming. The average temperature of the Earth's surface has increased by about 0.85°C (1.4F) in the last 100 years. Thirteen of the 14 warmest years were recorded in the 21st Century, with 2015 on course to set another record.

-The average temperature of the Earth's surface has increased by about 0.85°C (1.4F) in the last 100 years. Thirteen of the 14 warmest years were recorded in the 21st Century, with 2015 on course to set another record.
-The concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere is now higher than at any time in the last 800,000 years and reached a record high in May this year.
-An area of sea ice roughly 10 times the size of the UK has been lost when the current day is compared with average levels from the early 1980s.
-The changes could drive shortages in freshwater, bring about major changes in food production conditions and cause a rise in the number of casualties from floods, storms, heat waves and droughts.
Source B.B.C

Adam Pryor

Adam Pryor

Earth Hasn't Heated Up This Fast Since the Dinosaurs' End

Carbon is pouring into the atmosphere faster than at any time in the past 66 million years-since the dinosaurs went extinct-according to a new analysis of the geologic record. The study underscores just how profoundly humans are changing Earth's history.

-Carbon is pouring into the atmosphere faster than at any time in the past 66 million years
National Geographic and Nature.com

Anju Sharma

Anju Sharma

Tshering Tobgay: This country isn't just carbon neutral -- it's carbon negative

Deep in the Himalayas, on the border between China and India, lies the Kingdom of Bhutan, which has pledged to remain carbon neutral for all time. In this illuminating talk, Bhutan's Prime Minister Tshering Tobgay shares his country's mission to put happiness before economic growth and set a world standard for environmental preservation.

Bhutan, a small country nestled in the Himalayas that we tend to ignore, appears to be more intelligently educated than most of the developed and developing countries in the world. They measure progress by GNH - Gross National Happiness - instead of GDP. They are carbon neutral, rather carbon negative. Listen to this great twenty minute talk to learn about the wonderful citizens of a country that actually treats Mother Earth as their own.

Vidushi Sharma

Vidushi Sharma New Zealand recently ruled that animals are to be recognized legally as sentient beings, and I heard of Bolivia doing something similar as well. I wonder what it is that makes nations decide to prioritize their environment and wildlife publicly like this. What do you think?

0

Mason Clark

Mason Clark

8 ways people are fighting for forests this International Day of Forests

Love trees? Then celebrate - 21 March is the International Day of Forests!Without healthy, thriving forests, our planet cannot sustain life. But they are facing serious threats from human activity.

"More than a quarter of Indonesia's forests have disappeared in the past 25 years, destroyed for products like paper products and palm oil.
Cattle ranching is the single biggest use of cleared rainforest in the Amazon. Nearly 80 percent of deforested areas in Brazil were used for pasture as of 2009. The survival of the Amazon rainforest is fundamental for numerous plant and animal species, and for many Indigenous communities that depend on healthy forests for their livelihoods."

Adam Pryor

Adam Pryor

Meat and Sustainability
YouTube l https://www.youtube.com/

An interesting video on the level of Meat consumption and sustainability:
-Linkage between soy production and meat eating in Germany and destruction of rainforests in Brazil
-Meat eating and greenhouse gases.
-Impact on groundwater
More importantly we are digesting the same hormones and antibiotics that the animals are given

Are we ready for change?

Sofia Perello

Sofia Perello You should check out the Animals & Environment subinterest on the site! Discussions on meat and the environment are gaining steam now, as they should. http://www.thehobmob.com/pages/subinterest/subinterest.php?id=637

0