Rajat

Rajat

Do schools kill creativity? | Sir Ken Robinson
YouTube l https://www.youtube.com/

An old but very relevant Ted Talk by Sir Ken Robinson.

Rajat

Rajat

Hackschooling makes me happy | Logan LaPlante | TEDxUniversityofNevada
YouTube l https://www.youtube.com/

And this is the story of a child who saw that Ted talk and became a home schooler!

TheHobMob

TheHobMob

Simply Strangers? - KidSpirit Online

These strangers, my soon-to-be friends, were already friends of my friends. I had seen their faces, I knew where they were from, I knew who they were friends with, but I had barely had one conversation with them.

We post a link here from Kid's Spirit, a great place for teens to meet online. On strangers....
I spoke with a good friend of mine, Chelsea Miller, a soon-to-be senior at Westover School in Middlebury, Connecticut. She talked to me about how, in general, “we present an overly confident version of ourselves when we are online.”

“People then face character expectations of the other person when they first meet in real life, but are ultimately unhappy with the day-to-day, real life person. In the end, they prefer the deception that was created online.”

Elizabeth Kimball

Elizabeth Kimball

Stephen R. Covey " Blog Archive " Restoring Trust Can be an Enormously Positive Adventure

When examining the great losses we're seeing in the global financial crisis, one thing is very clear: one of the greatest losses we feel is broken trust. But all is not lost. It is a challenging path and a time consuming one, but trust can be re-built and restored.

Thought I would share this post from Stephen Covey about the concept of the Emotional Bank Account and the role "deposits" and "withdrawals" play in trust.
He says: "Like a financial bank account, you can make deposits and take withdrawals from the account. When you make consistent deposits, out of your integrity and out of your empathy—that means your understanding of what deposits and withdrawals are to other people—those two things—empathy and integrity—that little by little you can restore trust."

I like to think this way whenever I interact with someone, especially my children. Kids need healthy dosages of self-esteem. The way to build up self esteem is to make deposits in their Emotional Bank Accounts. Things like, "Wow, I really like the shirt you chose to wear today!" can really boost your kid's ego in a productive, nurturing way. Steve says is, "Make a conscious effort to make meaningful deposits in your relationships. When you make a withdrawal, apologize and correct the mistake." This is especially important for kids and their role models.

Mason Clark

Mason Clark

The Power of belief -- mindset and success | Eduardo Briceno | TEDxManhattanBeach
YouTube l https://www.youtube.com/

Excellent talk on inculcating a growth mindset rather than a fixed mindset in a child or parents themselves! " Feedback should be process related rather than result oriented" to avoid putting pressure on children when they face a challenging situation because of fear of failure."

Rajat

Rajat

Liberal arts colleges explore interdisciplinary pathways with computer science

Computer science might not be the first field that springs to mind when thinking of the liberal arts, but at some colleges, interdisciplinary computing is seen as one way to connect the department to other disciplines on campus. Bates College, a liberal arts college in Maine, may be the most recent example.

- “It’s inclusive of the notion that we’re dealing with the visualization of data, we’re dealing with big data. ‘Computer science’ does have a kind of old-fashioned quality to it.”
- “The worlds of work and social relationships are all being transformed by digital platforms, computational thinking and the reality of digital connectivity,”

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2016/02/23/liberal-arts-colleges-explore-interdisciplinary-pathways-computer-science

Sofia Perello

Sofia Perello I think a big barrier for most people is that many students in college who take computer science have been coding for years. It's hard to start in an environment like that! I think more schools should allow intro CS classes to be pass/fail, and in general, our entire education system should start implementing coding classes from earlier ages.

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Vidushi Sharma

Vidushi Sharma I agree and can relate. Though I was always good at math and science, I felt way out of my comfort zone when I took my first computer science class in college. I had to take it pass/fail, and was discouraged enough not to attempt any more till the fall semester of junior year (more than a year later!) I am so glad I picked it up again with the help of Vineet Gupta- a great mentor- and ended up being successful in the class. I started to love computer science and am now spending some of my time abroad playing with robots!

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Anju Sharma

Anju Sharma reposted Emma Zahren-Newman's Link


"The system manufactures students who are smart and talented and driven, yes, but also anxious, timid, and lost, with little intellectual curiosity and a stunted sense of purpose: trapped in a bubble of privilege, heading meekly in the same direction, great at what they’re doing but with no idea why they’re doing it,” he writes. His complaints turn most violently against the Ivy League and its spiritual siblings. The problems don’t start there, though. High schools, the job market, prestige-seeking universities, distracted professors, and parents—especially parents—all contribute to a culture in which kids are supposed to perform before they even start to learn."

Are Élite Colleges Bad for the Soul? - The New Yorker

Nathan Heller on William Deresiewicz's "Excellent Sheep," which, in attempting to debunk one myth of higher education falls prey to another.

“It’s not okay to study history, because what good does that really do anyone, but it is okay to work for a hedge fund. It’s selfish to pursue your passion, unless it’s going to make you a lot of money, in which case it isn’t selfish at all.”

Anju Sharma

Anju Sharma

How to Raise a Creative Child. Step One: Back Off

Contributing Op-Ed Writer THEY learn to read at age 2, play Bach at 4, breeze through calculus at 6, and speak foreign languages fluently by 8. Their classmates shudder with envy; their parents rejoice at winning the lottery. But to paraphrase T. S. Eliot, their careers tend to end not with a bang, but with a whimper.

The article basically talks bout how we stunt creativity by making a gifted child practice his skill to perfection. I totally believe in children being left alone especially without the devices these days that do not allow him to think, rather force constant action. However, in doing so, as a parent I think you might be leaving the child's future a mess in case he doesn't turn out to be Mozaet or Einstein. Some structure and discipline and of course practice to perfection are required to get him to a decent colleges to a degree to a job. And while money cannot buy you happiness, lack of money can get you unhappiness.

Adam Pryor

Adam Pryor This topic is such a tightrope. The article raises makes some interesting observations: Child prodigies rarely become adult geniuses who change the world; Practice leads to perfection but not re-creation of a domain; emphasis needs to be placed on a child creating their moral compass; The breath of knowledge, rather than simply depth leads to creative contributions.

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Rajat

Rajat Yes all this is thoughtful but again as a first generation immigrant without the financial cushion I also agree with "while money cannot buy you happiness, lack of money can get you unhappiness." Those who want to do good for others have to be able to fend for themselves to begin with.

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