Rajat

Rajat

Woo-woo; Whale Magic?

"When you lock eyes with them, Ken Balcomb says, "you get the sense that they're looking at you. It's a steady gaze. And you feel it. Much more powerful than a dog looking at you. A dog might want your attention. The whales, it's a different feeling.

Unfortunately it took "Blackfish" to bring fore the cruel treatment of these wonderful creatures by humans. Hopefully, we will be soon learning from their intelligence.

"When a very young killer whale named Springer mysteriously showed up near Seattle, she had just recently been weaned and her mother had been missing. Ken found her playing with a small floating tree branch, pushing it around. “I picked it up and threw it and she’d go after it, very playful. I started slapping the water and she started slapping the water with her pec fin. Then I looked at her and for some reason I just made a circular motion with my finger, like a ‘roll over’ signal—and she rolled over! I just went, ‘Wow!’ To get a dog to do all that, you have to work on training them to do that trick. I mean; she knew what I had in mind, like her consciousness was just sort-of linked with mine. There are no words for something like that.”
National Geographic.

More: Killer whales, or orcas, have the second-biggest brains among all ocean mammals, weighing as much as 15 pounds. It's not clear whether they are as well-endowed with memory cells as humans, but scientists have found they are amazingly well-wired for sensing and analyzing their watery, three-dimensional environment.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2010-03-smart-killer-whales-orcas-2nd-biggest.html#jCp

Rajat

Rajat This is another Orca resource by Dr. Paul Spong,a scientist who has been following and studying them out of captivity at the Orcalab http://www.orca-live.net/card/contents.html

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Mason Clark

Mason Clark

What I Learned From Tickling Apes

TICKLING a juvenile chimpanzee is a lot like tickling a child. The ape has the same sensitive spots: under the armpits, on the side, in the belly. He opens his mouth wide, lips relaxed, panting audibly in the same "huh-huh-huh" rhythm of inhalation and exhalation as human laughter.

"The ape also shows the same ambivalence as a child. He pushes your tickling fingers away and tries to escape, but as soon as you stop he comes back for more, putting his belly right in front of you.

Laughter? Now wait a minute! A real scientist should avoid any and all anthropomorphism, which is why hard-nosed colleagues often ask us to change our terminology. Why not call the ape’s reaction something neutral, like, say, vocalized panting?

..This accusation works only because of the premise of human exceptionalism. Rooted in religion but also permeating large areas of science, this premise is out of line with modern evolutionary biology and neuroscience. Our brains share the same basic structure with other mammals — no different parts, the same old neurotransmitters.

How likely is it that the immense richness of nature fits on a single dimension? Isn’t it more likely that each animal has its own cognition, adapted to its own senses and natural history? It makes no sense to compare our cognition with one that is distributed over eight independently moving arms

Increased respect for animal intelligence also has consequences for cognitive science. For too long, we have left the human intellect dangling in empty evolutionary space. How could our species arrive at planning, empathy, consciousness and so on, if we are part of a natural world devoid of any and all steppingstones to such capacities? "

nytimes: what-i-learned-from-tickling-apes.

David Trefler

David Trefler

Victims of a New African Massacre: Gorillas

The International Peace Information Service, an independent research institute based in Belgium, has documented more than 1,000 of these mines, and the Wildlife Conservation Society has counted at least 240 more within protected areas and proposed protected areas. The mines attract untold numbers of outside workers, who also need to eat.

It's tough to pay attention to endangered species-- there are so many that need our attention, and how are we to choose amongst them? But articles like this make me think we need a better way of publicizing the board of endangered species and linking people to effective charities that work to save them. Some central hub is needed!

Vidushi Sharma

Vidushi Sharma You're right in a way- resources need to be allocated, ultimately, to one cause over all others. The question of how to choose which species to save is an interesting one philosophically too. Have you read "Why do Species Matter?" by Russow?

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George Cohen Lee

George Cohen Lee I read that in a school class once. Her argument is that individuals in species, like great works of art, matter to us because of their aesthetic value. There is something aesthetically valuable in the soaring of an eagle or the prowl of a lion that we want to preserve for future generations. I think it applies well to the case of the gorillas above but not for smaller and more ordinary endangered animals.

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Rajat

Rajat Sad

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Jeff Gordan

Jeff Gordan

Why we love dogs and cats but not bats or rats

Why do we adore hamsters but abhor rats? Cuddle kittens but curse raccoons? Pay to keep birds inside and bats outside? A big reason, say researchers, has to do with our grandparents, our friends, Hollywood and the Queen of England. In other words, our culture.

Cultural influences in our selective love for animals. “Eye contact from dogs appears to trigger the release of oxytocin, the bonding hormone, in the human brain,” he said. “It also releases oxytocin in the dog’s brain."

Anju Sharma

Anju Sharma

Penguin swims 5,000 miles every year for reunion with the man who saved his life

This is the story of a South American Magellanic penguin who swims 5,000 miles each year to be reunited with the man who saved his life.

Such a cute story of a baby penguin who travels miles and miles to meet his savior.

Jeff Gordan

Jeff Gordan

An Ostentation of Peacocks

Is there a more ostentatious bird than the male of the Indian peafowl, the Peacock? I was introduced to this species at a very young age. Due to its popularity as an ornamental bird and its readiness to breed in captivity, Peafowl can be found in zoos, parks and gardens around the world.

Discovered this amazing blog on nature by David who calls himself an Incidental Naturalist. He says "Great wildlife encounters can occur through careful intent, but we sometimes overlook opportunities incidental to daily life. You never know what you will see on a holiday, a business trip, in the garden or even on a daily commute to work."
Source: http://incidentalnaturalist.com/about/

Mehmood Faisal

Mehmood Faisal very nice info

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